Historic sites linked to the legacy of Colman’s mustard in Norwich have been given protection, after the factory where the condiment was produced for more than 160 years shut down.

The factory, off Bracondale, closed its gates for the final time in 2020, with the bulk of production moved to Burton-on-Trent.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has since listed a number of sites linked to Norwich’s mustard legacy on the advice of Historic England.

It follows a request by Norwich City Council for Historic England to carry out a review of heritage sites in the area.

The conservatory at Carrow House in Norwich, the former home of the Colman mustard family, has been newly listed at Grade II*. (Patricia Payne/ Historic England/ PA)The conservatory at Carrow House in Norwich, the former home of the Colman mustard family, has been newly listed at Grade II* (Patricia Payne/Historic England/PA)

The conservatory of Carrow House, which was once the home of the Colman family, has been newly listed at Grade II*.

The conservatory, with ornate patterns in ironwork, stained glass and mosaic, was built in 1895.

Carrow House, already listed at Grade II in 1986, has had new information added to the list entry to give more detail – including on two ornate iron gates and, in the centre of the garden, a circular pond edged in stone.

Jeremiah James Colman extensively rebuilt the mid-19th century villa between 1860 and 1861.

New detail has been added to the existing Grade II listing for Carrow House, including of a circular pond in the garden. (Patricia Payne/ Historic England/ PA)New detail has been added to the existing Grade II listing for Carrow House, including of a circular pond in the garden (Patricia Payne/Historic England/PA)

From this elevated site, Colman could oversee his expanding milling business.

Other sites linked to industry in the same area of the city have been newly listed at Grade II.

They are the former Trowse railway station, built between 1844 and 1845, which was crafted from knapped flint, and the late 19th century engine house at Trowse sewage pumping station.

The sewage works at Trowse was built to improve social conditions around 1869 by Norwich Corporation as a public response to the problems of sewage disposal caused by the rapid suburbanisation and industrialisation of Norwich in the 19th century.

A staircase inside Carrow House. (Patricia Payne/ Historic England/ PA)A staircase inside Carrow House (Patricia Payne/Historic England/PA)

The early 20th century engine house at Trowse sewage pumping station, built in 1909 to replace its late 19th century counterpart, has also been newly listed at Grade II.

Further information has been added to the existing Grade II listing for the timber drying bottle kiln at Deal Ground in Norwich, which was built sometime between 1908 and 1929.

It was used to dry freshly sawn green timber to meet J & J Colman Ltd’s increasing demand for wooden crates and barrels.

The list entry from 1996 has been updated to give more detail on the kiln’s special architectural and historic interest.

The former Trowse railway station, built between 1844 and 1845, has been newly listed at Grade II. (Patricia Payne/ Historic England/ PA)The former Trowse railway station, built between 1844 and 1845, has been newly listed at Grade II (Patricia Payne/Historic England/PA)

Caroline Skinner, listing team leader, Historic England, said: “I’m delighted that we’ve had the opportunity to explore and assess these remarkable heritage sites in east Norwich and to ensure the protection of this area’s very special industrial heritage.

“Thanks to the foresight of Norwich City Council, who involved Historic England in the early stages of the East Norwich Strategic Regeneration Area, these fascinating buildings can continue to tell an important story of a local industry that became a globally recognised brand, and the societal changes that took place in the town at this time.”

Mike Stonard, Norwich City Council’s cabinet member for inclusive and sustainable growth, said: “This review by Historic England has shown just how important this area of the city is to Norwich’s rich heritage.

“It allows us to understand which buildings on these sites are of national importance and which are not – something that will ensure the emerging masterplan fully respects the heritage of the area.”